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Academic Submission Guidelines

2018-ism-conference-academic-paper-template.docx ACADEMIC SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

THE CONFERENCE ORGANISERS INVITE PAPER SUBMISSIONS ON ANY TOPICS RELEVANT TO SOCIAL MARKETING AND BEHAVIOUR AND SOCIAL CHANGE. CASE STUDIES ON SOCIAL MARKETING INTERVENTIONS ARE WELCOME, AS ARE CONCEPTUAL PAPERS, OR CRITICAL REVIEWS ON KEY ISSUES AND CHALLENGES IN DOING SOCIAL MARKETING. POSSIBLE TOPIC AREAS INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO THE FOLLOWING:​

 
  • The influence of religion, social factors, or culture on social marketing and social change
  • Critical social marketing
  • Unintended consequences from social marketing
  • When social marketing programmes fail
  • Advancing theory in social marketing
  • Trans-disciplinary research in social change
  • Innovative and new research methods in social marketing and social change research
  • Individual, group, community, and/or organisational wellbeing
  • Non-mainstream communities and groups
  • Undeveloped, under-developed, developing, and non-first world societies
  • Systems social marketing
  • Policy, legislation, and upstream social marketing
  • Transformative services and midstream social marketing
  • Health and wellbeing
  • Technology and new media
  • Environment and sustainability
  • Charity and not-for-profit
  • Licit and illicit substance (ab)use


 

Authors are asked to submit a two page paper for ISMC review. These guidelines have been developed to meet E1 publication criteria1. ISMC Papers should be two pages. Five pages is the strict maximum including references, appendices, and title page.


TITLE PAGE SHOULD CONTAIN

 
  • Authors name
  • Authors affiliation
  • A 150 words biography for the presenting author

PAPERS SHOULD BE

 
  • Single spaced throughout
  • Times New Roman 12-point font
  • A4 size page formatting
  • 2.5cm margins on all sides
  • Avoid footnotes
  • Four – five pages including references, appendices and title page

HEADINGS AND SUB-HEADINGS

 

Major headings should be centred and in bold typeface. The first letter of each major word should be capitalised. (Do not use block capitals throughout the words and do not use Microsoft Word “title case” function, as this capitalises minor words inappropriately). Sub-headings also should be in bold typeface, but left justified, with the first letter of each major word capitalised. Sub-headings should have one single space line before and one single space line following.

 

FIGURES AND TABLES

 
  • Should be kept to a minimum.

If figures and tables are deemed essential:

 
  • Should be integrated within the text as soon as convenient after they have been cited;
  • Headings should be bold, with leading capitals for major words (not block capitals), and be preceded and followed by one line;
  • Should be numbered and referred to by number;
  • Please only use black and white for figures and tables.
 

Tables should consist of at least four (4) columns and four (4) rows; otherwise their results should be integrated in the text. Designate units (e.g., $) in column headings. Align all numerals, including decimals. Refer to table in the text by number. Avoid using terms “above”, “below” and “preceding” to refer to the table. If possible, combine closely related tables. Make sure the necessary measures of statistical significance are reported within the table.

NUMBERS WITHIN THE TEXT

 

Numbers up to nine should be typed as words, e.g., two as opposed to 2, but 10 not ten.

 

MATHEMATICAL NOTATION

 

Mathematical notation must be clear within the text. Equations should be centred on the page. If equations are numbered, type the number in parentheses flush with the left margin. A marginal note should identify unusual symbols and Greek letters. If equations are too wide to fit in a single column, indicate appropriate breaks.

 

CITATION IN TEXT

 

Please ensure that every reference cited in the text is also present in the reference list (and vice versa). Any references cited in the abstract must be given in full. Unpublished results and personal communications are not recommended in the reference list, but may be mentioned in the text. If these references are included in the reference list they should follow the standard reference style of the journal and should include a substitution of the publication date with either ‘Unpublished results’ or ‘Personal communication’ Citation of a reference as ‘in press’ implies that the item has been accepted for publication.

REFERENCE STYLE

 

Same as for the Australasian Marketing Journal and should follow the referencing style used by the American Psychological Association (APA).

 

WEB REFERENCES

 

As a minimum, the full URL should be given and the date when the reference was last accessed. Any further information, if known (DOI, author names, dates, reference to a source publication, etc.), should also be given. Web references can be listed separately (e.g., after the reference list) under a different heading if desired, or can be included in the reference list.

 

REFERENCES IN A SPECIAL ISSUE

 

Please ensure that the words ‘this issue’ are added to any references in the list (and any citations in the text) to other articles in the same Special Issue.

 

LIST REFERENCE

 

List: references should be arranged first alphabetically and then further sorted chronologically if necessary. More than one reference from the same author(s) in the same year must be identified by the letters “a”, “b”, “c”, etc., placed after the year of publication.

REFERENCE EXAMPLES

 

Reference to a journal publication:

Van der Geer, J., Hanraads, J. A. J., & Lupton, R. A. (2000). The art of writing a scientific article. Journal of Scientific Communications, 163, 51-59.

 

Reference to a book:

Strunk, W., Jr., & White, E. B. (1979). The elements of style. (3rd ed.). New York: Macmillan, (Chapter 4).

 

Reference to a chapter in an edited book:

Mettam, G. R., & Adams, L. B. (1994). How to prepare an electronic version of your article. In B. S. Jones, & R. Z. Smith (Eds.), Introduction to the electronic age (pp. 281-304). New York: E-Publishing Inc.


1 There are no restrictions regarding length of a publication that may be reported for E1 purposes. Publications must meet the definition of research in the HERDC specification, in particular, it must represent: “substantial scholarly activity, as evidenced by discussion of the relevant literature, an awareness of the history and antecedents of work described, and be provided in a format which allows a reader to trace sources of the work, including through citations and footnotes”.
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